Japanese Actors Pretend To Lose Wallets, But The Response From Random Children Touches Their Hearts.

A message about morality and doing the right thing is embedded in a PSA from the Japanese Red Cross Society, which shows school-age children placed in possibly one of the first ethical conundrums of their young lives.

In the clip, titled “Can You Do The Right Thing?”the boys and girls are escorted by their mothers to a bus stop in Yokohama.

 
Japanese Red Cross Society

The montage shows the mothers telling their children to wait there for a moment while they step away, and it is during that moment– when they are unsupervised– that the boys and girls face a challenging dilemma.

One by one, several adults already gathered at the bus stop “accidentally”drop their wallets directly in front of the children.

One young boy wearing turquoise pants appears momentarily startled at the loud thump, then glances down at the wallet and up at the woman who dropped it.


Japanese Red Cross Society

A ponytailed girl in a pink jacket looks down at the wallet while brushing a strand of hair out of her face, clearly unsure of herself.

Another little girl takes a tentative step off the platform toward the wallet, and says barely audibly, “You dropped it.â€


Japanese Red Cross Society

One boy daringly musters up his courage, picks up the wallet and holds it up to the man standing next to him, politely saying, “Excuse me.”When the man does not react, the boy simply places the wallet back where it fell.


Japanese Red Cross Society

But during the 2:16 video, all the children eventually reunite the owners with their wallets, either by speaking up and pointing or picking the items up themselves; one little girl even goes so far as to brush it off before handing it over.

RocketNews24 explains that the video demonstrates the children’s willingness to do the right thing; their adult counterparts would likely shy away, rather than involve themselves in a stranger’s affairs as per Japanese cultural protocol.

For example, part of being courteous is not bothering others, but as I’ve talked about before, in rare instances that bit of well-meaning deference can get warped into not getting involved in other people’s affairs even when they’re clearly in a quandary.

But while adults sometimes stumble while walking the tightrope between forcing unasked for assistance on someone and helping those in need, what about children? That’s the question posed in this video showing a group of kids reacting to a stranger dropping his or her wallet at the bus stop, and the outcome just might restore a bit of your faith in humanity.



Japanese Red Cross Society

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